A precision building taking shape

20 02 2014

A precision building taking shape 2

Last week, we were pleased to welcome Jane Arthur, one of our HLF monitors to see how the new building is progressing. Jane is a freelance consultant for the museums, heritage and cultural sector and has been working with us on the project since we secured our HLF funding. She is particularly interested in an audience focused approach combined with an informed understanding of museum collection needs, and so has been assisting us in looking at how our Conservation Management Plan and Activity Plan work together.

This was Jane’s first visit on site – “It was fascinating to see the structures I was so familiar with from plans and elevations taking physical shape on site. I was struck by the contrast between changes in working practice describing the way the original building was constructed to current practice. The emphasis on precision and exact positioning, including modelling features in polysterene, practice brickwork and samples. In both old and new though there was care given to the selection and use of materials.

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But what really caught my attention were the colours – everything (apart from our bright high viz jackets) was in muted earth tones – from the gloopy mud to the brickwork. With this restricted palette I ended up looking closely at the subtle variations different tones of bricks make across a wall and the small patterns in the flooring slabs set off by the white of gallery walls. Looking out of the windows of what will be the restaurant in the trees I was amazed at how close the trees were to the building. With the glass in place the inside/outside feel was perfect, even on a very windy and grey afternoon. There are definitely landscapes in the building before the art goes in!”

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Our final photographs show Jane, with Bob from ISG and other Whitworth staff surrounded by scaffolding in the exhibition galleries, and then high up amongst the beams of the roof – Jane commented: “I always like going to parts of a site that will be inaccessible when the building is complete. Climbing up to the top of the original gallery to see the original structure we were accompanied by a gentle fall of ‘polysterene snow’ from the roof insulation.”

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